What makes a good marriage


I had some interesting conversations at the opening reception Saturday evening.  One man I talked to was interested in the paintings that used multiple panels.  He asked me why I didn’t have the panels read consecutively. Said he tried to imagine them lined up, turning them upside down, rearranging them in his imagination, but they refused to obey him.

My thought was that it is like a good marriage, the panels (in this instance there were two) are both individuals but are also together; they work together because they respect each other.  The friction of their differences makes it more exciting, less predictable.  Ultimately, they belong together, enjoy each other for their similarities and differences.

Of course, when  it works, it works well; when it doesn’t, there must be other options.